Actors'
Colony
at Bluffton
1908 - 1938
_____________

Buster Keaton
and the
Muskegon Connection

Postcards and images of the Muskegon

Downtown Muskegon
1900-1925

View a variety of postcard and images of the Muskegon area from the era.

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Downtown Muskegon
1926-1975

View a variety of postcard and images of the Muskegon area from the  the industrial age.

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The Path to Bluffton

The trip from the Goodrich Dock or Union Station in downtown Muskegon, to the playgrounds of the Actors' Colony, Lake Michigan Park and Pigeon Hill involved a leisurely ride down Lake Street - later known at Lakeshore Drive.

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Lake Michigan Park

Featuring entertainment facilities including a large bathhouse pavilion, a dancing pavilion with bowling alleys, a 600-seat theater, a lunch room, and in later years, an amusement park with a Ferris wheel and a roller coaster.  Located at the end of the trolley line in Muskegon, it was referred to as the "Coney Island of the West" in advertising.  Now known as Pere Marquette Park, it features one of the cleanest beaches in the United States.

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Pigeon Hill

One of the largest dunes on Lake Michigan, this mound of constantly shifting sand soared nearly  300 feet in the air and covered some 40 acres at  its base. It dwarfed the surrounding landscape and served as a backdrop for the homes in the Actors' Colony.

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Muskegon, Michigan:
Where Greyhound got it's name

Edwin Carl Eckstrom, launched Safety Motor Coach Lines in Muskegon in 1924. Providing intercity service between Muskegon and Grand Rapids, the firm was a direct competitor to local interurban service.In a few short years, the logo from Safety Motor Coach Lines became the nationwide symbol of Greyhound, and Eckstrom would become the company's president.

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